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Messages - Headwarmaz

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1
Media / Re: Headwarmaz: For the love of hip hop
« on: June 30, 2010, 08:30:11 PM »
If you would like your tracks to be played on the show, simply email and 'mp3' and details about the artist to headwarmaz@gmail.com

Headwarmaz...for the love of hip-hop

2
Media / Re: Headwarmaz: For the love of hip hop
« on: June 30, 2010, 08:28:52 PM »
This coming friday will be full of music for your listening pleasure. The music has been mixed for you already and we hope that you will enjoy it. Here are the tracks...

'I sweet le jam' - Ndandimthanda

Avalanche - Jazzed Illa

K.A.K - K.A.K

Skwatta Kamp - Politics

Defboyz - Nyaniso

Damola - Baby

Jaak - When god made u

Intelektu - Pagina errada

Nahum - My people

Perspektif - Vodka with Lenin

Proverb - Stop, think

Shaick - Eloquent Hobo

ATCQ - Find a way

Aesop Rock - Daylight

Benefit - Proceed with caution

Boom Bap Project - Reprogram

Brother Ali - The travelers

Capone N Noreaga - Wobble

MF Doom - Sofa king

De La Soul - Simply

Jazzy Jeff - For the love

Drake ft. Lil Wayne - Ignant s**t

Elzhi - The leak

Hi tek - Breaking bread

Jay Z - When the money goes

Insight - Evolve

Lupe Fiasco - Kick, push

Mos Def - Got

Do not miss out on this. Remember to catch Bush Radio 89.5 FM at 22h00 or simply log on to www.bushradio.co.za for a live-stream

3
Media / Re: Headwarmaz: For the love of hip hop
« on: June 28, 2010, 07:22:03 PM »
The last episode of the Headwarmaz was great. Here is a list of the music that was played...

Hishaam - All I do

The Headwarmaz Take 5 for July brought up these five tracks...

5. Mic Substance - I'm the reason
4. King Dan - Thembi
3. M-2 - I tried
2. R-block - Sthandwa sam
1. Tumi ft. Ian Kamau - Whole Worlds

We then opened the lines for listeners to Shoutout to the World. Some of the shoutouts were entertaining and some were strange.

Avalanche - Cape City
Emage - Tribute to mama
Izinga - Dark streets

We were then joined in the studio by representatives of RAPS Reloaded / Revival of the Headz. They gave us information on a ma**ive gig that will be happening this Wednesday at Mr. Pickwicks, Long Street in Cape Town.

More info here. http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#!/event.php?eid=125848130788580&index=1


We closed the show with and interesting selection from Coomz and Worst.

Bob Marley and Guru - Johnny was
De La Soul - Ooh
Endz The Otherness ft. Eavesdrop - Nature of Science
Ill-skills - Downtown City
KRS ONE -  I am there
Elzhi - Transitional Joint...

Make sure you do not miss another jam-packed episode of the Headwarmaz. Catch it every Friday at 22h00 on Bush Radio 89.5 FM. If you are outside Cape Town, visit www.bushradio.co.za and catch us on live stream

Headwarmaz...for the love of hip-hop



4
African artists step onto Cup stage   April 14, 2010

By Poloko Tau

Local and African musicians will be added to the official World Cup Kick Off concert after an agreement was reached in Joburg on Tuesday between the Fifa Local Organising Committee (LOC) and the artists.

Local musicians had expressed deep concern at the small number of South Africans scheduled to line up at the star-studded concert at Orlando Stadium in Soweto on June 10.

Arts and Culture Minister Lulu Xingwana initiated discussions with the LOC and the Creative Workers Union of South Africa (CWUSA), who called off their protest march scheduled for tomorrow.

Yesterday's meeting was the third time the parties had met.

The agreement was reached following discussions via a video link with Control Room, a Los Angeles-based company staging the Fifa concert.

Part of the agreement is that the SA Music Promoters a**ociation (Sampa) will work with Control Room to "satisfy BEE concerns".

In a joint press conference addressed by Xingwana, CWUSA and LOC boss Danny Jordaan last night, it was also announced that Sampa would have a direct line of communication with Control Room.

At the briefing, Xingwana said: "More artists will be included in the June 10 concert line-up, so that it should be more representative and re-flect gender and demographic concerns."

She said no names of the performers would be announced publicly until contracts had been signed.



Xingwana said a framework that would guide the selection of a line-up to ensure the majority of artists came from South Africa and the rest of the continent had been agreed to.

She also said "a huge percentage of the line-up" representative of South African and African artists would perform between 8pm and midnight, which would ensure that their performances were beamed live to millions of viewers globally.

It was also agreed to engage further on the arts and culture component at fan parks and public viewing areas to "make this a truly African arts and culture experience".

Meetings would be held with host cities to consolidate this engagement.

"I am glad that all stakeholders could agree on a way forward and on the principle of greater representation of South African and African artists on this major global platform to be held on South African soil," said Xingwana.

Jordaan said Fifa had always maintained that the "incredibly talented" South African and African music industry would play a major role in the tournament's off-field success and character.

"We're looking forward to the concert, where the majority (of performers) will be South Africans."

Jordaan noted that the 50-days celebration before the World Cup kicks off was fast approaching.


Headwarmaz Response...

It is a shame that our artists had to throw what seemed like a 'tantrum' so that they can be acknowledged. It is always painful to find that the world still does not take us seriously. Now it is up to the artists to put up one helluva show and show them where the real talent lies.

Read more here:

http://www.tonight.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=348&fArticleId=5429182

http://www.tonight.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=348&fArticleId=5412096

http://www.tonight.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=348&fArticleId=5384621

http://www.tonight.co.za/index.php?fSectionId=348&fArticleId=5283181


5
Hip Hop Events / Urban Peacock
« on: November 05, 2009, 04:50:28 PM »
URBAN PEACOCK @Daddy Long Legs Art Hotel
Hit Entertainment: hardy@hitentertainment.co.za, 072 889 0987
Host:   URBAN PEACOCK...initiate.create.celebrate.

Date:   Friday, 06 November 2009
Time:   19:00 - 22:30

On the 6th of November we will be bringing you another great event at Daddy Long Legs Art Hotel. As always it will be a mix of performance art and an exhibition. In terms of the art we’ll have on display, this time photography will be the art on focus. Photographer, Aiden (he was also the photographer at our last event) or David Scribbles as some may know him, will have his work on display along with another who we’ll leave a mystery. Come and find out!

We know that you all can appreciate great poetry so that’s how we’ll be starting off our evening to get those minds of yours ready for other great performances for the evening. This event we’ll be collaborating with Soul Life, the soulful artist management and events company who’ll be bringing along a couple of their talents. One of those talents being Nala, a duo of velvety voiced songstresses. They’ve performed in and around Cape Town and may be familiar to some of you.

Ladies, we all love a guy who can sing and play guitar, so at this event we have Anton on guitar another great talent we’ve found bringing in that great acoustic sound we all can appreciate. Then throwing something slightly different into the mix, we have Die Onheilige Hoog, an alternative Afrikaans band who be bringing along their great energy and love for the genre to our stage.

So there you have it, a perfect mix of art and music and it’s all for free! Please join us and bring along those who appreciate the creative...come show us love because that what we’ve put it together with.

See you there beautiful people! Till then...

Tina Matsimella (Co-owner, Marketing manager)
URBAN PEACOCK...Initiate. Create. Celebrate.

6
Hip Hop Events / ZOMG. There are people under the stairs...
« on: November 05, 2009, 04:49:33 PM »
People under the stairs

Brought to you by KOL, Hit Entertainment, and Butan Wear.

The underground hip-hop outfit People Under the Stairs was formed by Double K and Thes One, who met on the fringe of L.A.'s late-'90s hip-hop underground. The duo, devoted to jazzy samples, danceable beats, intricate rhyming skills, and laid-back humor, debuted in 1998 with the acclaimed "The Next Step" and followed it up in 2000 with "Question in the Form of an Answer".

Gathering heavy praise and touring with De La Soul, the group took their road experiences and brought it to the studio to record their next album. The final results appeared in the summer of 2002 under the name "O.S.T.".

Since then PUTS has followed up with 4 more albums and established themselves as one of the top underground hip hop crews.

Known for their energetic stage performances (rated the top performance at this year's world famous Bonnaroo Music Festival by Spin Magazine), PUTS is bringing the show to South Africa with 3 performances.

Shows:

Johannesburg: Friday, November 13
OST
Corner of Henry Nxumalo and Bree
Newtown
R100 Door

Supporting Acts:
DJ Kenzhero
DJ Intelligent Design
Mingus

Durban: Saturday, November 14
Zulu Jazz Lounge
231 smith street
Playhouse Complex
R60 Door

Supporting Acts
Hypermen
DJ P-Kuttah
DJ Intelligent Design

Cape Town: Kool Out Live - Friday, November 20
Zula Sound Bar
194 Long Street
R80 Door
R60 Limited Pre-Sale

Supporting Acts:
ILL-Literate-Skill
Mingus
DJ Raiko
DJ Intelligent Design

For more information, contact:

KOL: kool.out.lounge@gmail.com,
Akio: 072 814 4399
X: 074 575 4003

7
Hip Hop Events / Blacks only! After party...
« on: November 05, 2009, 04:48:36 PM »
David Kau, brings you  BLACKS ONLY COMEDY SHOW to Cape Town for the first time. The show will take place at CTICC on Fri, 06 Nov '09.

HEAD HONCHO and David Kau are getting together to put together an after party that fits this historical occasion.

The after party is happening at Seasons Botique at 22h00, on the same day.

Entertainment:

LEO LARGE // PH // OZY // MR JAY CHARLES plus a 1 HOUR set from the country's biggest hip hop DJ..... you'll have to be there to find out.

CC: R50 VIP: R70

8
Media / Re: Headwarmaz: For the love of hip hop
« on: October 14, 2009, 06:22:36 AM »
Headz on da spot

The hip-hop scene in Cape Town has two distinct aspects. There is the hip-hop club scene of which Long Street has long been the center stage. Youths from various parts of the peninsula congregate in the smoky venues and listen to hip-hop over a cold beer or a more expensive beverage. Discussions around themes of revolution, business acumen, and ‘who’s –bedding-who’ are the order of the day. Everyone usually has a good time.

On the flip side is the street scene. For years now, the streets of Langa, Gugulethu, Nyanga, Bonteheuwel, Khayelitsha, and Mitchells Plain have been the birthplace of many street poets/soldiers of Cape Town hip-hop. There are far too many names to mention in one sitting.

Happily, the hip-hop movement has grown even more. Now areas like Delft, Du Noon, Kraaifontein, Phillipi, Crossroads, Kuils Rivier, and even as far as Paarl have burst into the scene and demanded attention.

This week, we will be speaking to one of the street soldiers from Delft South. Delft is an interesting township. After years of informal settlements, Delft was recognized as a township as early as 1989. It shares its borders with Belhar, Blue Downs, Site C, Khayelitsha, Driftsands, Crossroads and Nyanga. Like many other townships in South Africa, people will be quick to point at the high levels of crime, unemployment (43%) and poor infrastructure as Delft’s defining characteristics.

No. There is a new energy in our townships. There is a youth movement. A hip-hop movement that is taking shape and setting itself up as a force to be reckoned with.

Tune in to the Headwarmaz show as we go into the mind and music of one such youth.


What legends are made of

This week we go into the archives to see what A Tribe Called Quest was made of. Nuff said.

Tune into the Headwarmaz show on Bush Radio 89.5 FM this Friday at 22h00 for 2 hours of the best in home-grown and international hip hop. If you are outside cape town, you can log on to www.bushradio.co.za to catch the live stream.

Headwarmaz…For the love of hip hop.


9
Media / Re: Headwarmaz: For the love of hip hop
« on: September 28, 2009, 06:02:20 PM »
Headwarmaz Take 5
[/color]


5. Thank you – Jay Z

Thank you is the 2nd track off Jay Z’s latest offering, Blueprint 3. The album’s official international release was on the 14 September 2009. The album sold an estimated 480 000 copies in the first week. This makes Blueprint 3, his eleventh #1 album.

On this track Jay Z predicts the sale status of this album…

”Please don't bow in my presence How am I a Legend?
I just got 10 #1 albums Maybe now 11
More hits than a Now! 11”

The album features the likes of Rihanna, Kanye West, Drake, Alicia Keys, Young Geezy, Pharell, and surprising appearances by West’s protégé’s Kid Cudi and Mr. Hudson.

Kanye West and No I.D are responsible for most of the production, with some tracks produced by Timbaland, Swizz Beats and Pharrel.


4. You’ve forgotten the words - Impozstah

This track comes from the debut album called Then and now: Volume 1. He is responsible for the majority of the production, with Arsenic (of the Maniac Metalloids) involved in production and mastering of the project.

3. Downtown City – Ill-literate Skill 

The album is Off the Radar…putting Cape Town on the radar. This Cape hip hop duo has put in lots of work and they continue to bear fruit. Having worked with Driemanskap, Reason, Nthabi and Proverb, they went on to share stages with the likes of Slum Village.

2. Workers Comp – Mos Def

The Ecstatic was released in June 2009 and received wide applause from critics. However the popularity was not converted into sales. The album debuted at #9 on the Billboard 200 , dropping to #29 in the second week.

The album features the likes of Slick Rick, Georgia Anne Muldrow and old friend Talib Kweli.

Production featured Madlib, Oh No and J Dilla.

1. Walk the walk – Jargon…

Keeping it strictly Cape Town, Jargon comes in at #1 with a track that brings together artists from the Delft South township. Banging beat and kick-a** rhymes, what more can you ask for?



The rest of the playlist included...

I miss home - Driemanskap

Cape 2 Angola - Wes P ft. Bonzaya

When god made you  - Jaak

Hotness - Bahamadia

Already home - Jay Z ft. Kid Cudi

Ileta - Phizo

By your side  - Gini Grindith

Sound bwoy burial - Smiff-n-wessun

Umi says - Mos Def

Get your walkin right - N'veigh

Watch out - Backyard crew

Enforcers - Illuminati getuies

A bathing harry - Lupe Fiasco & The gorillaz

Could you be  - Vast aire

Will the battle never end - Steel

Bent life - Aesop rock ft. C-ray Walz

It aint safe no more - Busta Rhymes

Time to take it back - Brotherhood basement.

10
General Discussion / Conscious hip hop versus Political hip hop
« on: September 23, 2009, 05:06:21 PM »
Greetings all,

I was browsing the internet and used a popular search engine to find 'best conscious hop hop'

The names that appeared most frequently included the following...

Talib kweli
Immortal technique
Dead prez
Common
Mos def
The roots
KRS ONE
Public enemy


The artists on this list have very different ways of expressing. Up until now i've always considered Technique, Dead Prez, KRS, and Public enemy to be political/social commentators. Common, Mos Def, Talib and the roots... were more hiphop artists who dabbled with elements of funk/soul.

How do we differentiate between conscious hip hop and political hip hop. Are they one and the same? Is one a subdivision of the other. Is it even necessary to separate the two.

What do you think?

11
You are reminded that these are the thoughts of one man. This is my attempt to redeem (for myself) the tarnished image of South Africa after upsurge the xenophobic attacks. For some they may appear to be justifications for South African attitudes. However, i hope those with a critical eye will view these thoughts as useful sidenotes as we try to understand and address the story of xenophobia. Please read, Reflections of a South African: Unpacking the baggage of Xenophobia (part 1), before continuing.

At the end of part one, I was starting to speak about how our leaders and other societal (authority) figures have at times encouraged a xenophobic attitude to fester.

Firstly, and most importantly, South Africans are given poor geographical education. It is rare to find a high school learner who knows the names, locations, capitals, presidents of at least fifty percent of the rest of African countries.

This disregard for the rest of Africa has led to South Africa being dubbed, Africa's United States.

It is therefore no surprise that South Africans are in the dark,let alone sympathetic, when it comes to the plight of refugees from wore-torn regions of Africa.

This ignorance is present at the highest levels of leadership, and has trickled down to those who are entrusted with public protection. The Police.

The police system is notorious for how differently they handle people of different races. Of course the South African black man has been at the mercy of the trigger-happy police since the beginning of the apartheid regime. However, things took a turn for the worst when the myth implicating Nigerians for importing drugs across our borders was circulated with vigour. This gave police license treat anyone suspected as being 'Nigerian' with the treatment usually reserved for stray dogs.

I was walking from the train station one day, and i pa**ed a police van that had five men lined up against it's sides, each one with their backs to the van. Two policemen were barking out orders and insults with liberal and nonchalant use of "kwiri-kwiri" (Xhosa version of kwere-kwere). After standing there for a while, i realised that the men where being ha**led for their IDs. Their inability to produce these was rewarded with hard slaps the cheek. All I could do was stand and watch.

It is said that the most unforgivable sin is not the evil of bad men, but the indifference of good men. Those of us who stood aside to watch similar events unfold are equally (if not more )accountable for Xenophobia along with those who beat, torched and pillaged. We allowed things to progress this far.

Hostility spread rapidly. Home affairs became a safe-haven for the xenophobic attendants. The workplace became unbearable. And of course, the foreigners living in the townships were vulnerable to the worst kinds of derision.

It was inevitable that violence would break out sooner rather than later.

(end of part 2)

Written by Wanda



12
Media / Re: Headwarmaz: For the love of hip hop
« on: September 05, 2009, 09:07:52 PM »
on the last episode of tha headwarmaz
[/color]

This show was a music special with 25 tracks being fitted into less than 2 hours. This is the list of music played on the last episode.

Intelektu - Processo immigratorio

Impozstah - Forgotten the words

Ill-literate Skill - Downtown city

Emage - Mxwaye

Tuboy Tulz - We gonna make it

Jay Z - Thank you

Jargon - Walk the walk

Axo - Story of my life

T.O.P-az - Mess higher

Perspektif - Vodka with Lenin

Driemanskap - Tsotsi

Typical Cats - Any day now

The fugees - the mask

Redman - Back inda building

Mobb Deep - Quiet storm

Bone-thugs-n-harmony - Paper, paper

Queen Latifah - U.N.I.T.Y

Cypress Hill - Insane in the brain

LL Cool J - Mama said knock you out

De La Soul - Ooh

Biz Markie - Just a friend

ATCQ - Bonita Applebum

KRS ONE - a friend

Busta Rhymes - Gimme some more

Steel - Will the battle never end

13
Media / Re: Headwarmaz: For the love of hip hop
« on: September 01, 2009, 12:20:50 AM »
Reflections of a South African: Unpacking the baggage of Xenophobia
[/color]

As a young South African male it saddens me that we have lost the trust and respect of the rest of the continent and the world. This is largely due to the recent surge of xenophobic attacks, which were not the first and not the last violent attacks towards our brothers and sisters. It is unfortunate that the South African who is actively involved in ensuring that our land is safe and hospitable for all, is lost in the backdrop of the blood-thirsty image that has come to represent the average South African.
 
Firstly, everything in this article does not undermine the plight of the displaced people of Africa, who have come to South Africa seeking refuge and stability. We too can empathise with this feeling. Not too long ago many of us were forced to grow up without fathers, uncles, mothers and aunts. They had all fled to avoid persecution by the Apartheid government. Those of us with some sense will remember how they sought asylum in Lesotho, Swaziland and populated all African countries reaching as far North as Uganda. The more fortunate or affluent ones were able to establish themselves in Europe and America.
 
Secondly, as South Africans we cannot avoid being held accountable for allowing hostility to simmer until it reached the boiling point in the Autumn/Winter of 2008. However, I do feel that we need to undertake a closer examination of the situations surrounding and leading to xenophobic attacks. This will a**ist us in ensuring that we can avoid a recurrence of such despicable acts.
 
There is ignorance that festers in the minds of the average South African. It has been the mainstay of xenophobia to repeat the now cliche motto "They have come to steal our women and jobs." However, there is a greater ignorance in neglecting to further examine this statement. To home in on the origins and sentiments that give birth to this notion.
 
Firstly, South Africa was prematurely annointed as the 'promised land'. Apartheid left a heavy imbalance in the economic structure of the country. The have-nots, manufactured by centuries of subjugation, have not been given the fair opportunity to reclaim the wealth and resources (or control thereof) that they had been denied. BEE was the only recognisable approach for restructuring the distribution of wealth. It is now clear that BEE has been used inappropriately by a chosen few to further their own economic well-being and indulge in the life of luxury. The average person on the ground has not, and will not, see the same benefits.
 
This has left the average South African shocked and dissapointed. They would not be able to cash in on the promise of 'a better life for all'. At the same time, this same person had to walk the streets and see that a growing number of 'foreigners' were filling the streets, working hard and getting paid. Companies started hiring more refugees as a source of cheap labour. One must remember that the unemployment rate is 23.5%. This translates into hostility for all those South Africans who are unable to secure jobs.
 
Media did not help the situation by attributing the growing crime rate to the increased number of immigrants. Police were free to mistreat refugees, especially those who did not have the adequate paper-work. This did not set a good example for the average South African citizen to follow. Disregard for all refugees was to follow.
 
End of part 1


14
As a young South African male it saddens me that we have lost the trust and respect of the rest of the continent and the world. This is largely due to the recent surge of xenophobic attacks, which were not the first and not the last violent attacks towards our brothers and sisters. It is unfortunate that the South African who is actively involved in ensuring that our land is safe and hospitable for all, is lost in the backdrop of the blood-thirsty image that has come to represent the average South African.
 
Firstly, everything in this article does not undermine the plight of the displaced people of Africa, who have come to South Africa seeking refuge and stability. We too can empathise with this feeling. Not too long ago many of us were forced to grow up without fathers, uncles, mothers and aunts. They had all fled to avoid persecution by the Apartheid government. Those of us with some sense will remember how they sought asylum in Lesotho, Swaziland and populated all African countries reaching as far North as Uganda. The more fortunate or affluent ones were able to establish themselves in Europe and America.
 
Secondly, as South Africans we cannot avoid being held accountable for allowing hostility to simmer until it reached the boiling point in the Autumn/Winter of 2008. However, I do feel that we need to undertake a closer examination of the situations surrounding and leading to xenophobic attacks. This will a**ist us in ensuring that we can avoid a recurrence of such despicable acts.
 
There is ignorance that festers in the minds of the average South African. It has been the mainstay of xenophobia to repeat the now cliche motto "They have come to steal our women and jobs." However, there is a greater ignorance in neglecting to further examine this statement. To home in on the origins and sentiments that give birth to this notion.
 
Firstly, South Africa was prematurely annointed as the 'promised land'. Apartheid left a heavy imbalance in the economic structure of the country. The have-nots, manufactured by centuries of subjugation, have not been given the fair opportunity to reclaim the wealth and resources (or control thereof) that they had been denied. BEE was the only recognisable approach for restructuring the distribution of wealth. It is now clear that BEE has been used inappropriately by a chosen few to further their own economic well-being and indulge in the life of luxury. The average person on the ground has not, and will not, see the same benefits.
 
This has left the average South African shocked and dissapointed. They would not be able to cash in on the promise of 'a better life for all'. At the same time, this same person had to walk the streets and see that a growing number of 'foreigners' were filling the streets, working hard and getting paid. Companies started hiring more refugees as a source of cheap labour. One must remember that the unemployment rate is 23.5%. This translates into hostility for all those South Africans who are unable to secure jobs.
 
Media did not help the situation by attributing the growing crime rate to the increased number of immigrants. Police were free to mistreat refugees, especially those who did not have the adequate paper-work. This did not set a good example for the average South African citizen to follow. Disregard for all refugees was to follow.
 
End of part 1


15
Media / Re: Headwarmaz: For the love of hip hop
« on: August 21, 2009, 03:14:02 PM »
By the by, our veteran in hip hop, Emile of Black Noise will be coming in to speak about this years instalment of the African Hip Hop Indaba. The details will be up all over.

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