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Xhosa Tribe

A pimp named Sarkozy

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 i ain't even got the slightest idea how that muhf***a looks. all i know is he owes a lotta people a lotta money with this church donation business.
f***in con artist... ::)

 ;D ;D ;D ;D Hilarious and cla**ic shit.


Papa ThReAdS

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we all jus people!
enough with all the unneccesary divisions!

maybe. but when we consider that most people define themselves using these "unnecessary divisions" it kinda gets hard talkin bout shit that u ain't even sure of. sure beats that jesus shit - i mean i know my mama came before me, her mama came before her, her mama came before her...u know...them ladies look like me. the reason all em clans began anyway wuz to continue someone's legacy - "thina kwa (whatever your clan name is) senza kanje...". sense of belonging, tradition, rituals all based on how the original Rhadebe, Dlamini, Jola, etc saw life/lived it...whatever. it still beats that jesus shit. even worse, i ain't even got the slightest idea how that muhf***a looks. all i know is he owes a lotta people a lotta money with this church donation business.

f***in con artist... ::)

so anyway, anyone really know what's goin on with all them tribes, clans, and other unnecessary divisions?

Even though you hurt him so with your blasphemous rant, JESUS LOVES YOU!
Beating bitches since 1982.


Papa ThReAdS

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JESUS LOVES Spacevein too!!
And he has wonderfull things planned for your life. All you have to do is go to church this weekend.
Beating bitches since 1982.


A pimp named Sarkozy

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And he has wonderfull things planned for your life. All you have to do is go to church this weekend.

Preach! Nigga! Preach! 8)



Papa ThReAdS

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And he has wonderfull things planned for your life. All you have to do is go to church this weekend.

Preach! Nigga! Preach! 8)



Hallelua Brother...
Praise Jesus!!
Beating bitches since 1982.


Papa ThReAdS

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Yall all still monkeys though.
Beating bitches since 1982.


Killa Merc

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I know that there are tribes in KZN which donít consider themselves Zulus. Like Amahlubi. They claim they were never conquered by Shaka. They speak Zulu (in KZN) and Xhosa (in the EC) but regard themselves as neither Xhosa nor Zulus. In fact you find them in areas like Matatiele speaking Sotho. Yet they regard themselves as a stand alone tribe / kingdom.  Thatís why when they go to initiation school they do it their way be they in Xhosa-speaking areas or Sotho-speaking areas.

Then there are others that claim that they are not Zulus and should have their own kings. Amangwane, Tembes, etc.  not clans, kingdoms. Just as is the case in the EC where there are different kings for different Xhosa speaking people.


Itís interesting to note how apartheid distorted kingship and traditional leadership in SA. It is widely accepted that leaders who didnít comply with the then gvt, were forcibly removed from their positions and replaced with people who toed the line.




Killa Merc

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People do things differently and people who tend to do things the same way group together

The most fascinating thing to hear is how new all these so called kingdoms are. Xhosa, Sotho, Zulu kingdoms, etc did not exist before the 17th century.
How did these people live before? in other words, the divisions are recent!


A pimp named Sarkozy

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True there Merchant!!!

Check out the following article it can enlighten you a bit!

Quote:
THE death of His Majesty King Xolilizwe Sigcawu, the monarch of the Xhosa, has highlighted a number of interesting and somewhat awkward questions.

It has also revealed the extent of the lack of knowledge on the part of many of the Xhosa-speaking people about their own history, culture and language. The result of such ignorance has been a slight distortion in the media of the true status of the king within the ranks of other monarchs in Eastern Cape.

It was inevitable that problems of tribalism would arise with the necessary recognition of the institution of traditional leadership in the new democratic order. Prospects of material benefits were also bound to complicate matters as various traditional leaders and hangers-on sought to elevate themselves by claiming positions for which they did not necessarily qualify.

I imagine it was partly due to apprehension over these problems that a number of seemingly enlightened Xhosa-speaking people did not acquaint themselves with their true cultural identity and traditional leadership. They did not want to be seen to be promoting tribalism when nonracialism was in vogue.

In our interaction as members of the Congress of Traditional Leaders of SA we do occasionally encounter instances of open and cra** tribalism. This manifests itself in the way in which delegates mobilise support for their preferred candidates for leadership positions. Merit and suitability are always pitted against tribal considerations and interests.

But as tribal leaders (I know a number of liberals are fond of derisively referring to us as such) we are quite comfortable to call each other by our tribal and clan names. We are able to confront our cultural diversity in a way that leads to an understanding of why certain of our groups follow customs that appear strange and anomalous to others. It is opportunities such as these which convince us that postcolonial Africa made a fatal mistake in seeking to sideline traditional leaders for fear of promoting tribalism.

The fact is that tribal leaders are better placed to fight and deal with the scourge of tribalism. Others can use it only to advance their political and economic ends. The conflicts ravaging a number of African states are testimony to this a**ertion. In SA there are whispers that we may be headed in that unsavoury direction.

The Transkei, as well as Eastern Cape in general, is regarded as a Xhosa territory. It is a Xhosa-speaking territory with a vast diversity of tribal groups, some of which are the Thembu (to which I belong), the Mpondo, the Mpondomise, the Bhaca, the Mfengu, the Bomvana, the Sotho and the Gcaleka.

When the Transkeian territories were forged into one administrative colonial entity ó and later a political one ó the traditional leaders of the area, as part of the system, learnt to interact with each other as such. The Xhosa language ó the dialect originally spoken by the Rharhabe and the Gcaleka ó had been codified by the missionaries and colonial administrators with the introduction of western education. All schools from Algoa Bay to the Mthamvuna River were required to teach that form of Xhosa. Easy communication among these groups was thus facilitated, even as each group continued to practise and follow its own unique customs.

In contrast to what King Shaka did in forging the Zulu kingdom, the Xhosa-speaking ones were given to promoting the creation of new kingdoms which, nevertheless, continued to be autonomous extensions of the original ones. Thus we had King Phalo of the Xhosa dividing his kingdom between his two sons, Gcaleka and Rharhabe, and King Faku of the Mpondo dividing his between Mqikela and Ndamase.

It was upon the death of the Thembu King Mthokrakra that his senior son Ngangelizwe left the original seat of power in Lady Frere, western Thembuland, to settle in Mthatha. His other son, Mathanzima, was left behind and practically allowed to rule the area without interference from the Thembu king Ngangelizwe. Mutual respect between the two brothers and deference to the senior by the junior were the hallmarks of the relations in the governance of the kingdoms.

This, broadly, is how we came to have six recognised kings in Eastern Cape. We do, of course, have one more kingdom, that of the Mpondomise, which is yet to be officially recognised. The British colonial government purported to abolish it on the grounds that the Mpondomise king of the time, Mhlontlo, was implicated in the killing of a magistrate, Mr Hope. But the line of succession has never been broken.

The other Eastern Cape tribes referred to either became part of the kingdoms in which they settled, or remained independent. Some of the latter retained cultural and sentimental ties with the kingdoms from which they had fled or which they had abandoned, such as the Bhaca from Zululand and the Sotho from Lesotho.

It is not conceivable, therefore, that we can ever see a reduction in the number of kings in the province. Attempts to do so would create more problems than they would solve. The current kings and their attendants cannot deport themselves as wiser than their ancestors, who were the authors of the legacy we have. The question of costs, important as it is, cannot be the decisive factor; it is a question of us either having traditional leaders, and bearing the consequences, or not having any.

Thus the late King Xolilizwe, while king of the Xhosa, was the ruler of the Gcaleka and not of all Xhosa-speaking people. This much he himself knew and could personally not have wanted it any otherwise. To seek to do otherwise, in his own name, would be mischievous.

As we bid farewell to this gentle giant of the Xhosa fighting stock, let us lower our shields also in honour of another king, His Majesty King Mayitja III of the Ndzundza Ndebele, who died last year.
Chief Pathekile Holomisa, president of the Congress of Traditional Leaders of SA, writes in his personal capacity - BusinessDay.


Alcatel

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People do things differently and people who tend to do things the same way group together

The most fascinating thing to hear is how new all these so called kingdoms are. Xhosa, Sotho, Zulu kingdoms, etc did not exist before the 17th century.
How did these people live before? in other words, the divisions are recent!

guess so. another thing is that some people spread out in different directions at different times for different reasons
a ha ha ha ha ha ah ah ah! AHa ahh aa a a.....


RearrangedReality

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some chick on Facebook wrote this. apparantly its from a book called The House of Phalo written by Prof. Pieres. I know some people might misunderstand the use of the word Bantu. Thats understandable but the word from its real meaning(= people) is, as i agree with what a lot say, just a reference used for a group of people who use the word Bantu to refer to people. So dont read it in the context of a deregotary term as it was used in the days on apartheid by the oppresors.

Quote
The Xhosa people share ancestry with the Bantu speakers who migrated into southern Africa sometime around the 2nd century AD. They uprooted and absorbed the indigenous Khoisian peoples living there at the time. As a result, the modern Xhosa share physical and cultural characteristics with their distant Khoisian cousins.
The first chief and acknowledged "father" of Xhosa society was named Tshawe. Some prominent chiefs of this period included Vusani of the Thembu clan; Gambushe of the Bomvana clan, and Faku of the Mpondo clan. The first of these chiefs whose reign can be dated by Western anthropologists is Phalo, who ruled from 1715 to 1775.
Phalo had two sons, Rharhabe and Gcaleka. Although Gcaleka was the rightful heir to Phalo's kingdom, Rharhabe develop a reputation (and a large following) as a fearless warrior. Eventually, rivalry between the two brothers resulted in civil war. Rharhabe was defeated and forced to flee west of the Kei River. There, he established a kingdom among the Xhosa currently living there. Unfortunately, this region was heavily populated and Rharhabe's arrival caused quite a bit of turmoil. Smaller clans defeated in battle were forced to settle elsewhere as Rharhabe sought to consolidate his power.
Rharhabe and his heir, Mlawu, were both killed during this period, and control of the clan transferred to Mlawu's son, Ngqika. Although the clan took Ngqika's name, he was too young to rule. As with Xhosa tradition, Rharhabe's other son, Ndlambe, served as ruler until Ngqika matured. As second son, Ndlambe had title, but no real authority--as soon as he was old enough, Ngqika would take over. Nevertheless, he supervised a major expansion in the size and power of the clan (now called the Ngqika).


A pimp named Sarkozy

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Thanks for that piece.

^^co-sign that! them crackers never cease to amaze me. and u'll be even more amazed to know even the proudest most 'xhosa' people don't actually even know ukuba zikhiphani.


TOIVO

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Quote
The Xhosa people share ancestry with the Bantu speakers who migrated into southern Africa sometime around the 2nd century AD. They uprooted and absorbed the indigenous Khoisian peoples living there at the time. As a result, the modern Xhosa share physical and cultural characteristics with their distant Khoisian cousins.
The first chief and acknowledged "father" of Xhosa society was named Tshawe. Some prominent chiefs of this period included Vusani of the Thembu clan; Gambushe of the Bomvana clan, and Faku of the Mpondo clan. The first of these chiefs whose reign can be dated by Western anthropologists is Phalo, who ruled from 1715 to 1775.
Phalo had two sons, Rharhabe and Gcaleka. Although Gcaleka was the rightful heir to Phalo's kingdom, Rharhabe develop a reputation (and a large following) as a fearless warrior. Eventually, rivalry between the two brothers resulted in civil war. Rharhabe was defeated and forced to flee west of the Kei River. There, he established a kingdom among the Xhosa currently living there. Unfortunately, this region was heavily populated and Rharhabe's arrival caused quite a bit of turmoil. Smaller clans defeated in battle were forced to settle elsewhere as Rharhabe sought to consolidate his power.
Rharhabe and his heir, Mlawu, were both killed during this period, and control of the clan transferred to Mlawu's son, Ngqika. Although the clan took Ngqika's name, he was too young to rule. As with Xhosa tradition, Rharhabe's other son, Ndlambe, served as ruler until Ngqika matured. As second son, Ndlambe had title, but no real authority--as soon as he was old enough, Ngqika would take over. Nevertheless, he supervised a major expansion in the size and power of the clan (now called the Ngqika).

the only thing that i am questioning about all of this is who the hell  is the author.. wait ill answer..  some Afrikaner Professor.. correct??...
what does he knw abt the Xhosa History?  As far as i knw History is written from the perspective of the victor ... rite?  so in this case the white men is...so who is to say that the  man who wrote this book was not just executing orders from the Apartheid Regime to confuse the black men  further..
just putting it out there.. use it, dont use.. i dont give a crawling shit.. but was just saying...what if that was the case....??



i'll resurect ur still born fetus and kill it again....


RearrangedReality

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the only thing that i am questioning about all of this is who the hell  is the author.. wait ill answer..  some Afrikaner Professor.. correct??...
what does he knw abt the Xhosa History?  As far as i knw History is written from the perspective of the victor ... rite?  so in this case the white men is...so who is to say that the  man who wrote this book was not just executing orders from the Apartheid Regime to confuse the black men  further..
just putting it out there.. use it, dont use.. i dont give a crawling shit.. but was just saying...what if that was the case....??



I hear you but point us to where theres credible information on this subject and tell us what in this paragraph suggests this was written by an afrikaner?