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Numbers Gangs in Cape Town

triplelife

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Seen this on BBC the other day. For those that dont know, Ross Kemp is a brit dude that profiles gangs all around the world. Check his other stuff on brazil and such. The cape town episode hit close to home thought some of yall might wanna see what the 1st world media airs 'bout SA. Interesting insight...what yall think?

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BHLAKHROZE

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i understand that gangs in cape town bring the drama. sometimes i wonder. its like it comes in waves. i mean im sure its consistent in that there are communities that face and feel the reality of gangs every single day. so perhaps then my question is directed to the media. what dictates the periods of this being a sexy issue. its like there is this lull and then again the issue occupies front pages and exposes. and yet more affirmations and crackdowns from government.

when docs like these are made. using prison space. and the authorities give consent for cameras to go in. do the people agree. those who end up finding themselves naked and bending over on reels.

and as for how he starts.

...ive come to one of the worlds most violent places...

no he must phuck right off basically. like come again. talk about drama.
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I actually have a question about one of the gangs since they already explained the history of the number gangs;

What is the history of the Americans gang?


triplelife

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Quote from: "BHLAKHROZE"


and as for how he starts.

...ive come to one of the worlds most violent places...

no he must phuck right off basically. like come again. talk about drama.


SA has been gettin alot of flack for its violence recently.....and its mainly to do with the pending World cup thing...seen some SA dude (not sure who it was) on BBC HardTalk taking alot of heat from the interviewer about safety in the country and what the gvt is doing bout it. Frankly its just haters hating on the fact that FIFA has come to africa
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Dpleezy

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yeah,,, media hypes things up no doubt, but the official stats don't exactly look good...

Murders in Cape Town - 2005/06: 1,856

This represents an annual murder rate of 57 per 100,000 population and an average of five murders a day.

Obviously stats don't tell the whole story, but when you consider that there were only 765 murders recorded in the whole of the UK (pop. 60,609,153) for the same period it's easy to see why someone from the UK would think Cape Town was a violent place.


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Take it from as someone who has been to prison on some bullish.We're living in hell on a daily.For those not affected by the things we face(be grateful)places like Valhalla Park,Parkwood,Mitchell's Plain,Mannenbeg,Hanover Park is no joke.The influence of the prison gangs are starting to seep in everyday life on the streets and are being popularized by doccies such as these.
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courtesy of rushay...

For more than 50 years, street gangs have been a defining part of life in the so-called coloured communities of the Cape Flats area of Cape Town, South Africa. "Coloured" was one of four expressions used by South Africa's former apartheid regime to characterize citizens, along with "Black," "White," and "Indian." The name refers to a fairly heterogeneous group of people of mixed Khoisan, white European, Malay, Malagasy, black, and South Indian heritage. In 1950, the Group Areas Act dismantled District Six, a mixed-race area in central Cape Town, relocating residents to racially designated sections of Cape Flats -- the infamous "dumping grounds of apartheid." The move brought together young men who had previously lived in different communities, creating a sudden competition for limited resources and territory that facilitated the growth of gangs. Under apartheid, black youths who may have found meaning in gang activities instead became involved in the struggle for liberation, but the coloured community did not have this outlet. As of 2003, the homicide rate within the coloured population was the highest in South Africa, and the Western Cape province, which includes Cape Town, had the highest crime and homicide rates in the country. Many Cape Flats residents feel there is a limited police presence in their community, and that officers in the area often accept bribes from gangs and/or tip gang members off when they receive complaints. Rampant alcoholism, meanwhile, can be traced to the nearby vineyards, which historically employed members of the coloured community, and to the practice of paying laborers partly in wine -- fostering violence, dysfunctional families, and fetal alcohol syndrome. Most gang members are initiated between the ages of 13 and 15, and are immediately armed with guns. Younger members are expected to a**ume the front lines in confrontations, to prove their mettle to senior members. For some, membership may last until the age of 40 or 50. The distinction between the real street gangs and the schoolchildren who simply imitate gang behavior can be blurry, but a few "name" gangs include: the Americans, the Junky Funky Kids, the Dixie Boys, and the Hard Livings Kids. The latter was led by the infamous Staggie twins, Rashied and Rashaad. Rashaad was killed in 1996 by a vigilante group called People Against Gangsterism and Drugs, but his brother, Rashied, or "Mad Dog," is still at large. Many of these street gangs are aligned with South Africa's prison gangs, which are known as the numbers. There are three numbers gangs, each of which was founded to serve a specialized duty within the prison system: the 26s were charged with acquiring money, the 28s dedicated themselves to improving conditions within the prisons, and the 27s moderated disputes between the other two factions. The command structure of the prison gangs is strictly hierarchical, like the military, whereas leadership of the street gangs is more informal. Street gang leaders tend to earn respect and status primarily through the strength of their personality, although this varies from gang to gang. The Hard Livings, for instance, operate by means of semi-democratic weekly meetings. Members show deference to the Staggie family, but do not otherwise rely on formal promotions. The Americans, however, are more closely aligned to the 26s prison gang and thus closely follow the 26s' chain of command. The gangs' primary source of income is drug running, in particular crack cocaine, which is also closely a**ociated with the prostitution trade. It can be a violent business. Armed violence also results from gang rivalries, and the easy availability of firearms can lead to deadly quarrels over girlfriends and perceived showings of disrespect. Indeed, gun violence is such an inescapable part of local life, many members say they are forced to join a gang for self-protection.
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The influence of the prison gangs are starting to seep in everyday life on the streets and are being popularized by doccies such as these.

[/quote]

Imagine a world where prison gangs are viewed as heroes. Imagine a world where gangs are the only role models. Where prison gang life is viewed as a career path (from the soldier/worker to general). That's kasi life for you ma fo.

Prison gangs been around for more than 90 years. In fact for the rest of the century. They have influenced a whole lot of shit in S.A. Many township kids view them as heroes. Many township kids still want to grow up and be part of them. It's more like a bravery sign.

The reality is: gangs were there/created to fight for black prisoners rights. The former system didn't give a f*** about prisoners, especially non white. For instance, when proper meals are demanded and the warden doesn't want to provide response, a guard/warden is knocked down in order to show how huge the demand is. When a warden is abusive towards prisoners, the gang will decide how to bring him to respect. He first gets warning, and if he propels he gets knocked in the head.

However, over the years, especially in the 80s things changed. In every system or institution there'll be always people who are corrupt. Who use the power of the system to abuse/oppress others. For instance, some Cape tycoons use drugs to influence prison gang members to perform dirty duties for them. These tycoons are gang members. But don't give a f*** about the gang, just the drug money in the streets, and the money coming in and out of jail. Even the Mike Jacksons find it easy to abuse children (young prisoners or young gang members) in such situations.

The problem about gangs now is that they are there to feed individual needs/the needs of the greedy and corrupt. It's not about the gang/prisoners anymore, it's about individuals. It's not about respek (which is the first law in every prison gang) for other prisoners/warders anymore. It's not about creating peace in the block.

 Recall, a lot of gang members are broke motherf***ers when they come out. A lot are street people/kids (especially the guys in the upper ranks). They never saw the reason to come out and so they excelled with the gang career. These are the guys that are easy to trick. These are the guys who don't have wives outside.



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Ethix

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I read a good book on the number a while back.....

http://entertainment.iafrica.com/books/non-fiction/486716.htm
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